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Author: Melanie Renzulli

Nell Zink’s Novel Journey

 

“There are a lot of ways to stay safe as a writer: by not writing, by writing to no one, by writing to a single admirer, by challenging the judgment of those with the power to judge, by not putting much effort into your work. ‘It’s hard,’ Zink writes in ‘The Wallcreeper,’ ‘trying to defend your territory and advertise your presence and keep out of predators’ line of sight.'”

Every word of this Kathryn Schulz profile of novelist Nell Zink is perfect. It helps that Zink’s life story and book plots are brimming with zaniness and improbability. This was such a joy to read.

Source: Bricklayer, Bird-Watcher, Literary Sensation

Surprise! Doing Things Alone Can Be Fun

A recent study mentioned in Slate (via Science of Us) suggests that many people, especially women, are afraid to take part in certain leisure activities alone, not just because of safety concerns but because of a psychological hang-up that others will pity them. This fear that others will think “that they could not find friends to accompany them” even extends to an activity which I think requires some alone time: museum-going. Read more

How I Live as a Writer

Clandestine coin collection in front of the Pantheon

Sponsorship.

If you’re a travel writer, this is a topic that often comes up. Will you take a sponsored press trip, a trip that is planned for you and/or a group of other writers, so that you can see places you may not be able to afford to go? Or, do you go it alone, rebuffing PR offers in order to maintain your objectivity or, at least, to stay in the good graces of publications like the New York Times, which blacklists – at least temporarily – those writers who have taken them?

Being sponsored is murky territory in the travel writing domain. It is the crux of discussions over travel writing ethics, conversations which seem to come up every time there is a conspicuous travel blogger hashtag campaign on Twitter. Sponsorship in travel writing – that is, having a trip partially- or fully- funded by a third party – is a grey area because many of those who write about travel cannot afford to work otherwise.

But there is another type of sponsorship that has been setting the writer discussion boards ablaze. At the end of January, Ann Bauer published “Sponsored by my husband: Why it’s a problem that writers never talk about where their money comes from,” an article with a cringe-worthy title and similarly obnoxious anecdotes relating to writers with money. Bauer offers a sympathetic tale of her own writing career path, one that she forged while poor, overworked, and living with her parents and that is now sustained by her second husband’s “hefty salary.” She makes the point that writers “do an enormous ‘let them eat cake’ disservice to our community when we obfuscate the circumstances that help us write, publish and in some ways succeed.”

I read many angry responses to Bauer’s piece. The article seemed to draw a line in the sand between those who are “sponsored,” i.e., those who come from money, have connected families, or married well, and those who are the “real” writers, i.e., those who hustle while living paycheck to paycheck or write on the side while working a full-time job. Writing from the perspective of those in the second camp, Laura Bogart, for Dame Magazine, writes, “I live in that in between of deadlines and bagged lunches, scrawling dialogue and outlines of scenes on the back of an agenda for a nine a.m. meeting. But it’s better than relying on anyone else for the roof over my head.”

As I read both of these articles, I couldn’t help but think there is a third reality. It is my reality. And in the interest of full disclosure, I will reveal the circumstances that allow me to write and publish.

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Writing Prompts, Prompt Writings

I’m doing it.

Here I am on the first day of NaNoWriMo — National Novel Writing Month — tapping away in a WordPress window. I am writing. Or, should I say, I #amwriting?

I don’t have to write a novel. But that’s what a lot of other writers are doing this month. The goal for most is to log 50,000 words, enough for a novel, by the end of the November. According to my tweetails, I already spend 28 hours every month JUST WRITING TWEETS (on average 33 per day). So 50,000 words should be a breeze, right?

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Welcome to New York

With the release of her new album “1989” and single “Welcome to New York,” Taylor Swift has crossed over from being a poster girl for Nashville to being a welcome ambassador for New York City.

NYC Tourism Ambassador Taylor Swift Standing On an NYC Roof
NYC Tourism Ambassador Taylor Swift Standing On an NYC Roof

Many in New York are calling this a questionable choice, as T.S. is a newcomer. In Swift’s defense, that’s kind of what ambassadors do. An ambassador is “a diplomatic official of the highest rank sent…on a temporary mission.” Swift is one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time. Plus, one of the great things about New York is that it’s a big salad bowl full of people from all different cultures and places, including the South (or, in Swift’s case, Tennessee by way of Pennsylvania).

I love Taylor Swift. I find her music infectious. Welcome to New York continues in that tradition. But her lyrics game has really dropped off!

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Yoga Joes: Army men strike new warrior poses

Yoga Joes are just like those little green army men you’ve seen in kids’ toy boxes. Only these men are doing yoga.

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These fun “toys,” which are geared more for yoga-practicing grown-ups than enlightened kids, were created by Dan Abramson, whose kickstarter project was just funded.

My hope is that Yoga Joes will inspire more children, men and military veterans to try yoga.

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Click the links above to find out more about Yoga Joes and how you can get some for yourself or a friend. Or a friend’s kid. You follow.

H/t Leigh Munsil; Photos Dan Abramson