Tag: Writing

The Best American Travel Writing 2014

The Best American Travel Writing 2014

The Best American Travel Writing, which highlights the best travel stories from the previous full year, arrives in bookstores and on tablets this week. The 2014 edition is edited by Paul Theroux, who has selected some outstanding reads from a variety of print and online publications. Here are few that you can read online right now:

Some honorable mentions include Thanksgiving in Mongolia, Ariel Levy’s devastating personal essay; The Fallout by Frank Bures; A Sort of Happy Ending by David Farley (yay, Farley!); Go Your Own Way by Douglas Mack (yay, Doug!); and How Hipsters Ruined Paris by Thomas Chatteron Williams.

The Best American Travel Writing 2014 is available from Amazon in print and on Kindle and as an Apple iBook. You can also buy directly from the publisher.

*These are the print magazine titles of these articles. The online titles are slightly different.

You Should Totally Apply For the TinyLetter Writing Residency

Writers’ residencies are becoming all the rage it seems. So here’s one where the wifi will probably work.

TinyLetter, the newsletter company, is putting up five writers for ten days at the Ace Hotel and Swim Club in Palm Springs, California. The timings for the TinyLetter Writing Residency are:

  • Application deadline: September 26
  • Residency: November 30 – December 9

They claim it will be a great environment to get things done, but I guess that depends on who the other four writers are.

Disclosure: I write tiny letters sometimes.

What Is Your Signature Word?

If you have a friend that you talk to on a regular basis, either over coffee or gchat, you’ll start to notice certain words that she uses. You have your own signature words, too, even though you may not even realize it.

Matthew J.X. Malady explores fingerprint words this week in Slate. How do we adopt them? How should we feel when “our” words get picked up by the masses?

“There is a lot of ambivalence there,” he says. “On the one hand we like that people admire or respect our choices. And to some extent we like being a leader. But there’s something also uncomfortable about people mimicking us. We want people to say, ‘Oh, that’s great,’ but not to start imitating us.”

[Slate]

Inspiring tweet of the day

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